Outer Hebrides, Scotland

2018-08-24 19-26-34

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Spring at WWT Slimbridge Wetland Centre

Slimbridge in Gloucestershire is home to the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust’s 120-acre waterbird reserve, boasting the world’s largest collection of swans, geese, and ducks.

 

Pictish Symbol Stones

The National Museum of Scotland has a wonderful collection of Pictish symbol stones; monumental stelae carved by the Pictish inhabitants of Scotland during the 6th-9th centuries.

Pictish symbol stone showing a goose and a fish, Pictish, from Easterton of Roseisle, Moray, Scotland, 500-800 AD
Pictish symbol stone showing a boar from Dores, Scotland, 500-800 AD
Pictish symbol stone of schist with crescent and double discs from Fiscovuig, Skye, Scotland 500-800 AD
Pictish symbol stone of rough sandstone with the incised figure of a bull, Pictish, from Burghead, Moray, Scotland, 500-800 AD
Pictish symbol stone sculptured on both sides with incised figure of a crescent, from South Ronaldsay, Scotland, 500-800 AD
Pictish symbol stone of granite, with circles and square-shaped figures, from Strome Shunnamal, Benbecula, Inverness-shire, 500-800 AD.
Pictish symbol stone from Scotland, 500-800 AD

 

The Ballachulish Figure, an Iron Age Sculpture

The Ballachulish Figure 

The mysterious Ballachulish figure is a roughly life-sized figure of a girl or goddess, carved from a single piece of alder, with pebbles for eyes. It was found in 1880, in Ballachulish, in Inverness-shire, Scotland and dates to the Iron Age, around 600 BC. The wooden sculpture was found in a bog overlooking the entrance to a sea loch, covered by the remains of a wickerwork structure.