Hetepni, an Ancient Egyptian Tax Collector

Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King. Old Kingdom, 6th Dynasty, 2200 BC, from Saqqara, Egypt, now at Neues Museum AM 34428
Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King, 2200 BC

 

Hetepni was an accountant and tax collector in the revenue office of the king over 4000 years ago in Egypt. Found in Saqqara, this mortuary statue tells us that he was was responsible:

‘…for the counting of everything that crawled or flew in the water and in the marshland‘.

The statue dates from the end of the 6th Dynasty, the last of the Old Kingdom, after which Egypt entered a period of political unrest. He may have served was Pepi II, who is credited at being one of the longest reigning monarchs in history at 94 years.

Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King. Old Kingdom, 6th Dynasty, 2200BC, from Saqqara, Neues Museum AM 34428
Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King, 2200 BC

Golden Octopus, 1500 BC

Gold octopus shaped cut outs which would have been sewn onto luxurious attire. They date from 1700 BC from Grave Circle A of the Mycenaean Acropolis.
Gold octopus shaped cut outs which would have been sewn onto luxurious attire. They date from 1700 BC from Grave Circle A of the Mycenaean Acropolis. Photo taken at National Archaeological Museum of Athens, 2013

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King Khasekhemwy, Second Dynasty Pharoah

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Khasekhemwy (ca. 2690 BC) was the final king of the Second dynasty of Ancient Egypt.

This statue of him in the Ashmolean Museum is the oldest example of royal statuary from Egypt. It shows him wearing the White Crown of Upper Egypt.

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30th Dynasty Canopic Jars

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These exceptional canopic jars from the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford belonged to Zenbastef’onkh, son of Harwoz and Nakhtubasteran. They date from the 30th dynasty (380-343 BC).

Above is seen Imsety, the human-headed protector of the liver, and Hapi the baboon-headed protector of the lungs. Below is Duamutef, the jacket-headed protector of the stomach.

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The Great Court at the British Museum

The Great Court at the British Museum
The Great Court at the British Museum

The largest covered public square in Europe, the British Museum’s Great Court was originally intended to be a garden. However with the creation of the reading room in 1852, the courtyard became the museum’s library and it wasn’t until it’s move in 1997 that the courtyard was opened again.

The Great Court at the British Museum
The Great Court at the British Museum

A competition was launched to find a new way to open the space to the public, eventually won by Norman Foster who took inspiration from the Reichstag’s domed roof in Berlin.

The Great Court at the British Museum
The Great Court at the British Museum

It is made of 3,312 uniquely sculpted panes of glass which were designed on computer and covers two acres. It increased the museums public space by 40%.

The Great Court at the British Museum
The Great Court at the British Museum