The Coffins of Nespawershefyt, Egyptian Official, 990-940 BC

The coffin and mummy board of Nespawershefyt (also known as Nes-Amun) dates from the Third Intermediate Period of Egypt, between 990-940 BC. It is decorated in the ‘yellow coffin’ style, with elaborate religious scenes and bands of text.

Nespawershefyt was Chief of Scribes, a high-ranking civil servant in the Temple of Amun Re at Karnak. He rose through the ranks during his lifetime, and his coffin was updated to reflect his changing responsibilities, with his titles as Supervisor of Craftsmen’s Workshops in Karnak and the Supervisor of Temple Scribes of Amun-Re being inscribed over the top of the old ones.

It was found in Thebes and donated to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge in 1822 by Barnard Hanbury and George Waddington. It is now on display in the museum and forms the centrepiece for their Egyptian funerary displays.

Fitzwilliam Museum Object Number: E.1.1822

Treasures of Ancient Egypt from the Fitzwilliam Museum

Hetepni, an Ancient Egyptian Tax Collector

Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King. Old Kingdom, 6th Dynasty, 2200 BC, from Saqqara, Egypt, now at Neues Museum AM 34428
Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King, 2200 BC

 

Hetepni was an accountant and tax collector in the revenue office of the king over 4000 years ago in Egypt. Found in Saqqara, this mortuary statue tells us that he was was responsible:

‘…for the counting of everything that crawled or flew in the water and in the marshland‘.

The statue dates from the end of the 6th Dynasty, the last of the Old Kingdom, after which Egypt entered a period of political unrest. He may have served was Pepi II, who is credited at being one of the longest reigning monarchs in history at 94 years.

Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King. Old Kingdom, 6th Dynasty, 2200BC, from Saqqara, Neues Museum AM 34428
Seated statue of Hetepni, chamberlain of the King, 2200 BC

King Khasekhemwy, Second Dynasty Pharoah

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Khasekhemwy (ca. 2690 BC) was the final king of the Second dynasty of Ancient Egypt.

This statue of him in the Ashmolean Museum is the oldest example of royal statuary from Egypt. It shows him wearing the White Crown of Upper Egypt.

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30th Dynasty Canopic Jars

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These exceptional canopic jars from the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford belonged to Zenbastef’onkh, son of Harwoz and Nakhtubasteran. They date from the 30th dynasty (380-343 BC).

Above is seen Imsety, the human-headed protector of the liver, and Hapi the baboon-headed protector of the lungs. Below is Duamutef, the jacket-headed protector of the stomach.

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